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Tangaliya Shawl

As the name suggests, ‘Tangaliya’ is derived from the word ‘Tangalio’ meaning the lower part of the body. Traditionally, tangaliya was a 10 by 4 cloth which was draped around the waist. Later on, due to loom size constraints, the cloth was woven 20 by 2 in size and then cut into two parts and joined together to form a shawl for women. Originating from the Saurashtra region of Gujarat, Tangaliya shawl falls under one such craft which is very unique. These shawls were woven in the Surendranagar district of Gujarat. This has been a very the indigenous craft which has a deep-rooted origin and history of about 700 years embedded in the Saurashtra region of Gujarat. First of all,...

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Uppada Jamdani Sarees

Uppada Jamdani Sarees are silk sarees that are woven in Uppada of East Godavari district in Andhra Pradesh. Although the jamdani style of weaving originated in Bangladesh, in the 18th Century it was brought south to Andhra Pradesh. This style of weaving is as old as 300 years. The process of weaving takes nearly 10-60 days time for which 2-3 weavers spend approximately 10 hours every day. The weavers use pure lace (silver zari dipped in melted gold) and also the finest silk from Bengaluru area.The cotton body and silk pallu are completely handwoven. The amazing feature about this sari is that the weavers design it in such a way that it can be folded and fit inside a matchbox....

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Screw Pine Craft

The screw pine craft of Kerala is used for making various types of mats and wall hangings. It is done by using the leaves of the screw pine plant. This practice has been in Kerala as long ago as 800 years. The mats produced by the screw pine have a significant role in the customs of Kerala. It is considered an honor to present these mats to visitors.  The traditional method for extracting the fiber of screwpine leaves involves coconut fiber. The coarse fibers remove the small thorns that appear on both sides of screwpine leaf. These fibers are processed, i.e. dyed and tied together into small clumps. The raw fibers are cooked in boiling milk for some time. This helps to cure them and makes them silkier....

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Pashmina

Coming from Kashmir in India, Pashmina is a fine cashmere wool. The word ‘Pashmina’ is a Persian word which means ‘made from Pashm’ and ‘Pashm’ means wool in Persian. The wool comes from the special goat that is the Pashmina goat which is a special breed of goats accustomed to high altitude regions of Nepal and India. The Changpa tribe is known to be the traditional producer of Pashmina wool in Ladakh. The people of this tribe rear sheep in harsh and chilly winter to produce this wool. Every spring the cashmere wool is collected from the goats shedding their winter coats. The Pashmina has two different varieties such as Ladakh Pashmina and Pashmina from Nepal. The shawls from Nepal...

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Muga Silk

Assam’s Muga silk is known for its extreme durability and natural yellowish-golden tint. In the old times, it was reserved only for royalty. It is often compared to being as valuable as gold. Muga silk is mainly produced by the Garo community of Assam. The semi-domesticated multivoltine silkworm called Antheraea Assamensis are fed on the leaves of Som and Soalu plants. The silk thus produced from them has a glossy texture and is quite durable. At least an acre of land is required by a silk farmer to cultivate about 400 grams of Muga silk. Roughly 2 months are required to weave a single Muga silk saree, but the actual weaving process takes about one week to 10 days to...

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