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Baghi prints

From the Bagh village in Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, this bold and vibrant hand block printing technique has been passed down from the Chhippas of the Khatri community who migrated to Bagh, 400 years ago. Bagh printing is a tedious and time-consuming process which involves around 15 steps where a single composition may consist of over 1300 different impressions. After soaking the fabric in raw sea salt and non-refined castor oil and goat dung it is then dried three times in succession. After drying for 15 days, the cloth is dipped in a solution of harada or baheda powder and washed in flowing river water. The deep hue of Bagh prints is brought on by boiling the fabrics in water...

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Molakalmuru Sarees

Molakulmuru sarees are a production of a small town, Molakulmuru in the Chitradurga district on the borders of Karnataka. The sarees are stylized with depictions of flowers, leaves, trees and other natural motifs. The fabric of the saree is silk, which takes upto 40 days to finish weaving.   Predominantly, these sarees showcase abstract temple motifs where the border of the saree is interlocked with the shell to produce a temple design.These sarees are woven using dobby looms with a mix of traditional and computer designs.The demand of these sarees can be seen mainly in Mysore, Bangalore, Shimoga and Gulbara. These sarees are worn with traditional gold jewelry on the neck, wrists and ears. Molakmuru weavers also produce silk brocade sarees...

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Chanderi Sarees

Chanderi sarees date back to the 12th and 13th centuries and originate from the town of Chanderi in Madhya Pradesh, India. Initially chanderi silks were used in weaving ‘khilats’, ceremonial robes given to someone as a mark of honour. The material was thus very expensive. The silk showcased it’s beauty with its softness, transparency, and fringes embroidered with heavy golden thread.  The process of weaving a Chanderi has been practiced over many generations. It has created a long lineage of skilled weavers who cannot be replaced. Being one of the jewels of India’s textile industry it holds a special place in every wearer’s collection. Originally, the fabric is woven with hand-spun cotton yarn which can be fine upto 300 counts. This fine count cotton is...

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Kotpad Handloom Fabrics

Amongst the variety of handlooms in India, the traditional Kotpad sarees were the first to receive the Geographical Indication of India tag. It is a vegetable-dyed fabric woven by the tribal weavers of the Mirgan community of this village.Kotpad sarees offer an excellent blend of colors and soft fabric, which provide the most comfort to the wearer. Hence, they are becoming very popular amongst the younger generation.

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