Knowledge Corner RSS



Madurai Sungudi

Madurai Sungudi sarees originate from the Southern Temple City Madurai and are made by the Saurashtra communities since the sixteenth century during the Nayak dynasty rule in Madurai. The word ‘sungudi’ is specially denoted to Sourashtra community and is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘sunnam’ which means ‘round’. Thus, sungudi actually means ‘ringed dots’. These ringed dots are spread all over the saree due to which it gives a unique and special appearance to the saree.

Continue reading



Salem Silk

Salem silk sarees that are often referred to as Salem silks are sarees that come in vibrant, long-lasting colors. These sarees come from the district of Salem in Tamilnadu. The name is a derivation of the term “Salya”, the ancient weaving community. These sarees began to be woven on a large scale during the 1980s. These sarees are worn on a variety of occasions. . Salem silk sarees come in bright colors with large motifs. The fabric is very soft and durable making them aesthetically appealing. With almost 130 spinning mills and weaving units, Salem has more than 20,000 families engaged in creating these beautiful sarees.

Continue reading



Mysore Silk Sarees

Mysore silk sarees originate from the state of Karnataka which happens to be one of the largest mulberry silk producers in the country. The growth of this silk was brought about during the reign of Tipu Sultan in 1785 AD. It is a max of fine silk and pure gold zari. These fabrics were the first known production of machine-made silk sarees in India. Raw materials used in making the saree are obtained from a single cacoon. Processes like soaking, twisting, wafting and winding are followed once the density of the silk is assessed. The weaving process involves two types of looms; Dob by loom and the Jacquard loom. It takes 4 hours to make one saree. The next step,...

Continue reading



Baghi prints

From the Bagh village in Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, this bold and vibrant hand block printing technique has been passed down from the Chhippas of the Khatri community who migrated to Bagh, 400 years ago. Bagh printing is a tedious and time-consuming process which involves around 15 steps where a single composition may consist of over 1300 different impressions. After soaking the fabric in raw sea salt and non-refined castor oil and goat dung it is then dried three times in succession. After drying for 15 days, the cloth is dipped in a solution of harada or baheda powder and washed in flowing river water. The deep hue of Bagh prints is brought on by boiling the fabrics in water...

Continue reading



Molakalmuru Sarees

Molakulmuru sarees are a production of a small town, Molakulmuru in the Chitradurga district on the borders of Karnataka. The sarees are stylized with depictions of flowers, leaves, trees and other natural motifs. The fabric of the saree is silk, which takes upto 40 days to finish weaving.   Predominantly, these sarees showcase abstract temple motifs where the border of the saree is interlocked with the shell to produce a temple design.These sarees are woven using dobby looms with a mix of traditional and computer designs.The demand of these sarees can be seen mainly in Mysore, Bangalore, Shimoga and Gulbara. These sarees are worn with traditional gold jewelry on the neck, wrists and ears. Molakmuru weavers also produce silk brocade sarees...

Continue reading