Knowledge Corner — sarees RSS



Ikat Sarees

As per earlier sources of information, Ikat dates back to the 12th century when the artisans from the Patan region of modern-day Gujarat migrated to Orissa. The Ikat technique has its origins in different parts of the world such as South America, West Africa, etc. This technique is one of the most ancient techniques of dyeing fabrics. The term ‘Ikat’ is a derivation from the Malay word ‘mengikat’ which means to tie or to bind. Ikat is an elaborate dying process which is done with silk or cotton fabrics. Ultimately, the end result is a piece of cloth bathed and glittered in colorful patterns. Orissa Ikat is basically associated with saris. The making of Ikat patterns is a tad bit...

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MOTIFS USED IN INDIAN TEXTILES

          A motif is the most basic unit from which a design is formed. It is generally developed from different combination of geometrical shapes. Motifs are repeated in different ways to create a pattern whereas patterns are repeated to create designs. Therefore a motif has a distinct identity of its own in a pattern or a design. Indian motifs has its own heritage value and are closely linked to natural, cultural, religious and socio-economic factors prevailing in  Indian society. Most of the traditional motifs are often inspired from nature. PEACOCK MOTIF -  Peacock which is now the national bird of India is the symbol of Indian ethnicity, tradition and exquisiteness. It is often associated with rain and...

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Kancheepuram Silk

Kancheepuram silk has dominated the south Indian silk industry since decades and will continue to do so not only because of its individuality but also because of its very fine silk fabric, which in itself has an added luster. The best quality of this silk fabric comes from Tamilnadu. The name of this fabric is kept so as to acknowledge the place from which it has originated that is, the Kanchipuram district in Tamilnadu. These silk sarees are handwoven with mulberry silk. This silk is dyed with various beautiful colors and then woven together with the golden thread which is also known as ‘zari’. This whole process takes about a maximum of 10 to 20 days for one saree, and...

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Uppada Jamdani Sarees

Uppada Jamdani Sarees are silk sarees that are woven in Uppada of East Godavari district in Andhra Pradesh. Although the jamdani style of weaving originated in Bangladesh, in the 18th Century it was brought south to Andhra Pradesh. This style of weaving is as old as 300 years. The process of weaving takes nearly 10-60 days time for which 2-3 weavers spend approximately 10 hours every day. The weavers use pure lace (silver zari dipped in melted gold) and also the finest silk from Bengaluru area.The cotton body and silk pallu are completely handwoven. The amazing feature about this sari is that the weavers design it in such a way that it can be folded and fit inside a matchbox....

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Pashmina

Coming from Kashmir in India, Pashmina is a fine cashmere wool. The word ‘Pashmina’ is a Persian word which means ‘made from Pashm’ and ‘Pashm’ means wool in Persian. The wool comes from the special goat that is the Pashmina goat which is a special breed of goats accustomed to high altitude regions of Nepal and India. The Changpa tribe is known to be the traditional producer of Pashmina wool in Ladakh. The people of this tribe rear sheep in harsh and chilly winter to produce this wool. Every spring the cashmere wool is collected from the goats shedding their winter coats. The Pashmina has two different varieties such as Ladakh Pashmina and Pashmina from Nepal. The shawls from Nepal...

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