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Chikankari Craft - With Love from Lucknow

Chikankari Craft - History According to the historical records of the 17th century of East India Company, Dhaka produced the fine embroidery called ‘Chikan’. After that, the Chikankari craft was brought to Lucknow in the 18th century. It is said that Noorjahan, wife of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir introduced it in Lucknow. Chikankari is claimed to be one of its kind due to its kind of hand embroidery. This artistic work of embroidery is done with untwisted yarn and also a little assistance of needle on a fine plain fabric. The material used is normally plain white, pink, maroon, shades of green and so the work of embroidery could be seen clearly on the material.Previously, Chikankari craft work was always done...

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Muga Silk

Assam’s Muga silk is known for its extreme durability and natural yellowish-golden tint. In the old times, it was reserved only for royalty. It is often compared to being as valuable as gold. Muga silk is mainly produced by the Garo community of Assam. The semi-domesticated multivoltine silkworm called Antheraea Assamensis are fed on the leaves of Som and Soalu plants. The silk thus produced from them has a glossy texture and is quite durable. At least an acre of land is required by a silk farmer to cultivate about 400 grams of Muga silk. Roughly 2 months are required to weave a single Muga silk saree, but the actual weaving process takes about one week to 10 days to...

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Kota Doria

Kota Doria sarees get their name from Kota, a small city in Rajasthan where these sarees were generally manufactured. The term Doria means thread. These sarees are manufactured mainly by the Ansari community of the Kota state, mostly located on the outskirts of the state. 1500 weavers are located in this cluster which is about 15km from Kota city. The distinct features of this fabric include its intriguing square pattern. The fabric is very lightweight and is most comfortably worn in summers. It is very low maintenance making it one of the favorites of our population. The unique square weaves are called ‘khats’. This one of a kind checkered weave of the Kota sari is made on the traditional ‘pit...

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Ilkal Saree

Ilkal saree is a traditional piece of clothing produced in the town of Ilkal in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka state. They are famous for the ‘tope teni’ technique, which involves the joining of the body warp with the pallu warp with a series of loops. This technique is exclusively used in Ilkal. Preparatory work requires 2-3 artisans while the weaving process only requires 1 person. Production can take upto 7 days, with the help of a hand-loom. The warp threads for the body are prepared seperately from the pallu. Both using different silks; artificial or pure. Generally the color used on the border is the same as the pallu. The distinct characteristic features in these sarees is the embroidery...

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Puneri Pagadi

The Puneri Pagadi is a turban originating from the city of Pune, Maharastra. It was commonly a symbol of pride and honor but over the years the use of the traditional pagadi in India can also be seen amongst youngsters in schools and colleges. The pagadi was introduced in the 19th century by Mahadev Govind Ranade, a social reformer. It is used mostly on special occasions like wedding ceremonies, worn by the groom, and traditional days in schools and colleges. Pagadis are also used as a very important piece of accessory on many occasions, be it a wedding or some prayer ceremony. Some religions also use it as their symbol of honor, that is the Sikhs. Pagadis have also become...

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